Compiled by Jirair Tutunjian
Posted by Nayiri Abrahamian
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The official signature of Kemal Ataturk was designed by Hagop Cerciyan. Mr. Cerciyan, who was a teacher at the Robert College, had studied the Palmer Method of handwriting system in the U.S. He was asked by Ataturk to formulate his signature which Cerciyan did in one day.

Martayan--“The Opener/Revealer”

Linguist Hagop Martayan, who fought in the Turkish War of Independence, led reforms of the Turkish language. At one time he was the secretary-general of the Turkish Language Association and contributed to the Turkish Encyclopedia. He was named “Dilacar” by Ataturk. It means “The Opener/Revealer” of the language. For years Turkish media would not identify that Martayan was Armenian. He died in 1979.

Varoujan Voskanian

Varoujan Voskanian was the vice-president of the Writers’ Union of Romania and chairman of the Armenian Union of Romania. His “The Book of Whispers” about the Armenians won many awards (2009) and was translated into seven languages. Turkey protested the publication of the bestseller saying that it offended the feelings of Turks. Romania was the first nation to open its doors to the Armenian Genocide victims. Armenians began to settle in the country as early as 1000 AD.

of the Armenian Union of Romania. His “The Book of Whispers” about the Armenians won many awards (2009) and was translated into seven languages. Turkey protested the publication of the bestseller saying that it offended the feelings of Turks. Romania was the first nation to open its doors to the Armenian Genocide victims. Armenians began to settle in the country as early as 1000 AD.

Andrea Martin

Comedian and “Second City” veteran Andrea Martin’s autobiography titled “Lady Parts” won rave reviews when it was published in 2014.  Born in Portland, Maine, she moved to Toronto at 23 where she made a name for herself as a leading comedian. Her parents were Armenian (her original name is Papazian). In the book Martin talks extensively about her Armenian descent and her trip to Armenia. She wrote that her grandfather took the name “Martin” from a name of a truck. Andrea Martin is a distant cousin of Cher.

Armenian Byzantium Emperors and Empresses

One out of five Byzantium emperors and empresses were ethnically Armenian or half-Armenian, although culturally Greek. Emperor Heraclius (founder of the Heraclian Dynasty), Basil I (founder of the Macedonian Dynasty), Romanos I, John I Tzimiskes, and Nikephoros II were Armenian. From the 5th century on the Armenians were regarded as the main constituent of the Byzantium army palace guard and were selected from among the bravest Armenians.

Sultan Abdul Hamid II's Ancestry

Enemies of Sultan Abdul Hamid II (responsible for the massacre of Armenians in the 1890s and one of the bloodiest Ottomans) was nicknamed “the Armenian” by his Turkish enemies because, it was said, his dark, doleful features must have come from his Armenian mother, although she was a Circassian. Others questioned his paternity, by suggesting that it was his father from whom he inherited an Armenian cast. Both the suggestions are ironic given his reputation as a killer of Armenians. Although an incompetent ruler, he knew a great deal about finance, which he had learned from an Armenian banker who handled his personal fortune.

Sergey and Nikolay Sarkisov brothers

Sergey and Nikolay Sarkisov brothers, who have a total wealth of $2.7 billion, are the fourth-richest family in Russia. They own the RESO holding company.

Catherine Rstakian and French writer Robbe-Grillet

Catherine Rstakian, who was the wife of famous French writer Robbe-Grillet, played a crucial part in the author’s life as his inspiration. They met in Paris’ Gare de Lyon as they were boarding a train to Istanbul. He was instantly taken by her. Barely out of her teens and weighing no more than 40 kilos, she swept away the writer by her charm.

First Woman Oceanographer

The world’s first woman oceanographer was an Armenian by the name of Anita Conti (Garakoshian). She was born in Ermont (France) in 1899 to Istanbul-born parents who had fled the Ottoman Empire during the massacres of Armenians. She married Marcel Conti (an official at the Italian Embassy in Vienna) who supported his wife’s scientific ambitions. In 1935 she was the only woman on board Theodor Tissier oceanographic trip. A few years later she continued her explorations in the Pacific, Indian and Arctic oceans. Among her projects was to find seeds and plants which could be turned into nutritious foods. In 1947 she worked with Jacque Cousteau. She continued her oceanic explorations until the age of 80 and throughout her career received rave reviews from major publications such as “Le Monde” and “Le Figaro”. She died in 1997 at the age of 99.

Urartu most effective rival of Assyria

From a book titled “Forgotten Scripts” by Cyrus H. Gordon: “Armenia nurtured an ancient civilization. Its iron and copper mines were important in a world that needed metals for its technology and daily life. The biblical flood story has Noah’s Ark landing on the Mountains of Ararat (=Urartu, as Armenia is called in the cuneiform records). This can only mean that Armenia was considered an important centre when the Genesis Deluge account was formulated. Located in the mountains where Turkey, the Soviet Union and Iran meet or come near each other, Armenia was in a position to resist the onslaught of the Assyrian armies more successfully than many of the other targets of Assyrian imperialism. Indeed, from the ninth through the seventh century B.C., Urartu was the most effective rival of Assyria, and until 714 B.C., when Sargon of Assyria invaded and weakened Urartu, the Urarteans were the rivals of the Assyrians in claiming to be the world’s leading power.”

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